Credits

Commissioned by:  Edmunds Consulting Pty Ltd

Produced by: Morningside Sound Productions

Narrated by: Jennifer Huxley

Producer and editor: Louisa Doran Edmunds

Creative designer and co-producer: Julie Berry

Script: Mary Edmunds

Research and interviews: Mary Edmunds and Nawal El-Gack

Art works: Kagi Kowa

Music: Ajak Kwai, WJ de King, and Kodok Chan Amal

Assistance with song translations: Gabriel Bul Yak

Assistance with interviews: Monica Aguang

Technical Consultant: Dusan Mastena

Disclaimer

Interviews were conducted in people’s homes or workplaces, so the quality of recordings varies. Some stories are told in other voices where the original recordings were unclear.

Acknowledgements and thanks for permission to use material

Members of the South Sudanese communities in Canberra and Melbourne who participated in the project, especially the Dinka congregations of St George’s Anglican Church, Pearce, ACT and St Paul’s Anglican Church, Spence, ACT.

Ajak Kwai 2016 Of cows, women and war (album). http://www.ajakkwai.com/music/

Akol Miyen Kuol 2013 The Last Train. Nairobi, Kenya: Camerapix Publishers International Ltd.

W J de King 2016 Peace. Lowkilili Kingdom.

2016 Zaman Towil (a Juba Arabic word that translates as ‘Long time’. dedicated to ‘our soldiers who spent sleepless nights just to keep us safe’.)

https://www.reverbnation.com/wjdeking

ABC Foreign Correspondent, 3 August,2016: Get up, stand up (South Sudan).

British Library, World and Traditional Music.

https://sounds.bl.uk/World-and-traditional-music/Dinka-songs-from-South-Sudan

University of Edinburgh Linguistics and English Language Department, Nilotic Prosody project (http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/nilotic/summary.shtml). The songs in this collection were recorded and annotated as part of the project Metre and Melody in Dinka Speech and Song. This project was carried out by researchers from the University of Edinburgh and the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, and funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council as part of the Beyond Text programme.

http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/nilotic/resource.shtml, Song/speech data, first example sung by Kodok Chan Amal on the death of Dr John Garang and translation.

John Mor, Richard Blattman and other family members and friends who contributed to the podcast.

Source references

Hugo, Graeme 2009 Migration between Africa and Australia: a demographic perspective. Background paper for the Australian Human Rights Commission’s African Australians: A review of human rights and social inclusion issues. Sydney, Australia: Australian Human Rights Commission.

Hutchinson, Sharon Elaine 2000 Nuer ethnicity militarized. Anthropology Today Vol. 16 No. 3, June 2000, pp. 6-13.

Jakobowicz, Andrew 2010 Australia’s migration policies: African dimensions. Background paper for the Australian Human Rights Commission’s African Australians: A review of human rights and social inclusion issues. Sydney, Australia: Australian Human Rights Commission.

Jok Madut Jok and Sharon Elaine Hutchinson 1999 Sudan’s Prolonged Second Civil War and the Militarization of Nuer and Dinka Ethnic Identities. African Studies Review Vol. 42, No. 2, September 1999, pp. 125-145. www.jstor.orgstable/525368.

Kebbede, Girma 1997 ‘Sudan: The North-South Conflict in Historical Perspective,’ Contributions in Black Studies: Vol.15, Article 3 pp.15-45. http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cibs/vol15/iss1/3.

Stern, Orly 2011 ‘This is how marriage happens sometimes’: Women and marriage in South Sudan. In Bubenzer, Friederike and Orly Stern (eds) Hope, pain and patience. The lives of women in South Sudan. Johannesburg: Jacana Media.